Former Hockey Coach Sentenced To 62 Years

first_imgBradley Elliott, 57, of Sterling, worked for the district as a junior varsity hockey coach at Kenai Central High School for the 2005-06 school year. He was also involved with the hockey program at Soldotna High School for three seasons, from 2007 to 2010. The victims that filed the suit are “seeking damages in excess of $100,000 from the Kenai Peninsula Borough School District, the Kenai Peninsula Hockey Association and former hockey coach”, according to court documents. Elliott faces 62 years and 240 days in prison, with 42 years suspended and a $300,000 fine. A status hearing is scheduled for December 18, according to Courtview. Facebook0TwitterEmailPrintFriendly分享A former hockey coach on the Kenai Peninsula was sentenced on Monday to 62 years in prison for sexual abuse of six minors and possession of child pornography. According to charging documents, Elliott plead guilty to a total of 15 charges, including six charges of 2nd-degree sexual abuse of a minor, one charge of possession of child pornography and eight charges of indecent photography. A suit was filed against the Kenai Peninsula Borough School District and the Kenai Peninsula Hockey Association in February claims the two organizations failed to “warn students” and alleges negligent hiring, training and supervision practices. The damages sought in excess of $100,000 were listed in court documents for “psychological and counseling expenses, rehabilitation expenses, physical injury, emotional distress, pain and suffering, inconvenience and loss of enjoyment of life.”last_img read more

ESPN The Magazine Launches in Mexico

first_imgESPN The Magazine in Mexicowill have an initial print run of between 20,000 and 30,000, according to anESPN spokesperson. The majority of ads will come from the local Mexican market,the spokesperson says.ESPN also publishes ESPN Deportes La Revista, aSpanish-language sports magazine in the U.S.,and launched ESPN The Magazine in Chinain October 2004. ESPN Publishing is expected to announce a partnership today with aMexican publishing company to launch ESPN The Magazine in Mexico.ESPN’s Spanish-language edition, the company’s secondinternational launch, will be Mexico’sonly monthly general sports magazine, the publisher says. Editorial contentwill be managed by Mexican publisher Grupo GW and will include what ESPN calls”locally relevant content.””A Spanish-language edition of ESPN The Magazine in Mexicois a natural extension of our efforts to serve sports fans in the country andit compliments our other ESPN-branded initiatives, including television, radio,Internet and broadband,” executive vice president and ESPN Internationalmanaging director Russell Wolff said in a statement.last_img read more

Paste Launches Obama MiniSite

first_imgLast year, the magazine began placing ads in the footers of editorial pages, alongside page numbers, launched a ‘VIP’ subscriber program and an online ad network. The Obama site is also a traffic grab, as the URL redirects to Paste’s Web site, and a banner ad appears at the top. Paste, the Decatur, Georgia-based music and entertainment magazine that’s developed a penchant for innovative experimentation, has launched a Web site—Obamicon.Me—that allows users to create their own digital versions of the iconic Barack Obama “Hope” poster.TheShepard Fairey-designed poster became a cult phenomenon, and was one ofthe iconic images of the 2008 presidential campaign—one that inspiredmagazine covers from 5280 to Time.Already, more than 10,000 “Obamaicons” have been created.Thata music and entertainment magazine would launch a Web site that hasalmost nothing to do with the music or entertainment industries is unusual,but sorta par for the course for Paste. In 2007, the magazine rolledout a pay-what-you-want subscription offer modeled after the rock bandRadiohead, which allowed its fans to pay what they wanted to downloadan album.last_img read more

Strategic Repositioning of Playboy Coming

first_imgFlanders declined to comment on the specifics of the repositioning other than to say he expects to make a separate announcement sometime this year.“Having a president to manage day-to-day operations will go a long way in enhancing efficiencies and avoiding duplication of efforts,” Flanders said of Vaickus’ appointment. “I’m confident he can help unify our often disparate operating units. We’re in every segment of media, internationally. The complexity is significant.”Vaickus will continue to oversee Playboy’s licensing business—what Flanders has described as the company’s fastest-growing segment. Playboy also named Playboy Digital executive vice president Scott G. Stephen executive vice president of the recently combined print/digital group. Reporting to Vaickus, Stephen’s responsibilities will expand to print publications, the company said.“Absolutely Committed” to PrintThe print edition of Playboy, the company’s flagship product, has had a difficult 2009. Of the more than 30 big-circ. consumer magazines—including AARP, Reader’s Digest, Maxim and Newsweek—only Playboy fell short of fulfilling its rate base through the first half of the year, delivering a total paid and verified circ. of 2,453,266, compared to its 2.6 million rate base, according to ABC’s most recent FAS-FAX report.In terms of advertising pages, the magazine saw a decline of 30.2 percent compared to the same period last year, according to PIB figures.Despite those losses, Flanders said the print edition of the magazine will survive the company’s forthcoming strategic repositioning. “I am absolutely committed 100 percent to keeping Playboy in print,” he said. “The magazine is the cornerstone of what we do, it’s what the brand was built on. “That doesn’t mean we won’t continue to expand in other segments of the business that might grow faster,” Flanders added, “but print isn’t going anywhere.” SEE ALSO: What to Expect of a Playboy RepositioningRecently-appointed Playboy Enterprises CEO Scott Flanders said he is planning to announce a “strategic repositioning” of the company before the end of the year. As part of that plan, he promoted Alex L. Vaickus from executive vice president and president of global licensing to the newly-created position of president, overseeing all of the company’s business operations.“We are in the process of reviewing all of our go-to market strategies,” Flanders told FOLIO: Tuesday. “We see opportunities for growth that will only be brought about with change.”last_img read more

AMMC Tuesday Recap

first_img “We think about labeling very carefully,” said Condé Nast’s Dirk Standen. “We aren’t trying to fool our readers.” Lacy agreed, continuing, “From my perspective, we all have to look at things that are non-traditional,” but reiterating seconds later that, “print is the fundamental underpinning of any media program.” “The silver bullet is our knowledge of the consumer,” added Lacy, “and our ability to move away from our reliance on things like direct mail and the newsstand.” “There’s not a day that goes by when I’m not asked for a cover,” added Essence editor-in-chief Vanessa De Luca. “They want to be associated with a brand that’s trusted. They can’t create that relationship on their own.” On a panel about native and content marketing, Hearst Magazines digital media VP Lee Sosin stated that the recently-released FTC guidance on best practices in native advertising will level the playing field and help legacy brands rise to the top, ostensibly due to their relative adherence to transparency and journalistic integrity compared to less-established startups in a crowded digital field. “We have the greatest content makers in the world,” said Condé Nast president and CEO, Bob Sauerberg, on an afternoon panel that included Ripp, Hearst Magazines president David Carey, Meredith chairman and CEO Stephen Lacy, and Rodale Inc. chairman and CEO Maria Rodale. See also: AMMC Day One Recap Like advertisers, individuals still recognize the power of being associated with popular magazine brands, reported the speakers on a panel about selling celebrity news. Ripp closed an optimistic CEO panel by urging the audience to “seize this moment of disruption in magazine media,” but the discussion wasn’t the only highlight of an event program brimming with marquee names—both within magazine media and without. When Stelter turned the discussion towards just what types of efforts the companies were making to embrace change, Ripp reported that Time Inc. had just hired its first ever chief data officer, arguing that everything publishers do is in some way a data collection effort now. Promoting greater synergy among brands, too, is key. Sauerberg said video for Condé Nast. Lacy described learning to better interact with the consumer and shifting marketers “to the bottom of the purchase funnel.” Rodale, whose company announced the bold move to cut print advertising from Prevention on Monday, said there’s simply not as much to lose anymore, so even the largest publishers feel free to take risks. “Consumer revenue, in any shape or form,” stated Rodale. “Trust in the media is at an all time low. Consumers are willing to pay for media that’s free of bullshit.” “The only thing that limits us is our creativity and our willingness to think differently,” added Time Inc. EVP of business development, Erik Moreno. Indeed, where the “Independents” touted all of the bold and innovative ways they’re embracing and thriving in a fast-evolving magazine media world on Monday, Tuesday’s programming allowed the industry’s giants to reassert both the enduring prominence of their brands and their positions as powerful creators in today’s content-hungry environment. Secret service personnel weaved through the crowd of magazine media pro’s at the Grand Hyatt in advance of First Lady Michelle Obama taking the stage alongside actresses Lena Dunham and Julianne Moore to promote the White House’s charitable education initiative Let Girls Learn. Condé Nast, Hearst, Meredith, and Time Inc. pledged a combined $9 million in advertising space to the cause. Obama drew some cheers from the sharp audience when she referred to her successor as the “First Spouse.” Magazine covers remain a powerful commodity, the panel argued, and publishers are in a position to leverage that authority, said The Hollywood Reporter-Billboard Media Group president Janice Min. Stelter closed the discussion by asking each participant to name their biggest growth area for the year ahead. “We’ll keep fighting for the print business,” said Sauerberg, adding that consumers love magazines and predicting that this connection will allow magazine media to flourish as the economy—and advertisers’ bottom lines—improves. Brand power, after all, extends across any medium. None of the five executives blinked when asked by CNN’s Brian Stelter what made them nervous in today’s climate. Arguing that all media is naturally disruptive, Carey said publishers have been forced to adapt and have become much better at subscription generation. Time Inc. chairman and CEO, Joe Ripp, closed day one of the American Magazine Media Conference (AMMC) Monday afternoon by declaring that, once again, “content is king.” “No one has ever said, ‘I’m dying to see my client at the top of the feed on ESPN.com,'” said ESPN The Magazine and ESPN.com editor-in-chief Chad Millman. “You can’t make a poster out of that.” Elsewhere on the event program, Arianna Huffington promoted her upcoming book, “The Sleep Revolution,” and late-night host Seth Meyers chatted about the Iowa caucuses over lunch with Gayle King, New York Magazine columnist Jonathan Chait, Time editor Nancy Gibbs, and Vanity Fair contributing editor Michael Kinsley.last_img read more