April 3 2000 Andy is preparing for the Farmers Ma

first_imgApril 3, 2000Andy is preparing for the Farmers Market which is held every two weeks in theCafe. Photo by: DoctressNeutopialast_img

The BBC is to reduce the video offering on its Red

first_imgThe BBC is to reduce the video offering on its Red Button service on Sky, Freesat and Virgin Media from five streams to one as part of a series of changes to the Red Button service.Tom Williams, development editor for red button and dual screen in BBC Vision, said the consolidation of the video service, which will take place on October 15, was necessary because the cost of using linear broadcast technology to deliver multiple streams. The Freeview version of the service delivers only a single video stream.Williams said the change “in no way signals the demise of BBC Red Button”. He said the service would continue to support a wide range of TV and radio output including events such as Wimbledon and the Glastonbury Festival. However, the reduction in the number of video streams will mean that the BBC will no longer be able to offer multiscreen coverage of big events via broadcast platforms. The multiscreen services will continue to be available online, meaning that viewers with access to connected TV services will be able to view them on TV. Williams said the BBC was “developing new ways of bringing enhanced coverage of major events to your televisions in the future”.The BBC will move forward with plans to develop its ‘Connected Red Button’ service, outlined earlier this year by BBC on-demand general manager Daniel Danker, combining elements of the Red Button service with elements of BBC Online. New functions will include live restart of programmes. The first version of the service is set to launch later this year.last_img read more

McMafia The BBC reported a record 328 million prog

first_imgMcMafiaThe BBC reported a record 328 million programme requests on iPlayer in January, marking “the best month on record” for the catch-up service.The BBC said the number of shows accessed on the iPlayer in January was up 10% compared to the same month in 2017, with an average of 10.6 million daily requests for TV content in January this year.BBC crime drama McMafia was the most popular show of the month, with episode one of the series streamed 3.4 million times. Three other episodes from this series were among the top-10 most requested shows in January.The other top 10 most-requested shows of the month were episodes of the dramas Silent Witness and Hard Sun, as well as three episodes of long-running soap opera Eastenders.“2018 has got off to a flying start, thanks in no small part to a range of gripping BBC dramas. McMafia, Hard Sun and Silent Witness dominate our most popular programmes on iPlayer for January, as does the always strong-performing EastEnders,” said Dan McGolpin, controller of programming and daytime for the BBC.“It was also impressive to see the wildlife series Big Cats make this month’s top five performing series with an average of over 1 million requests per episode. It’s been a great start to the year, and we’re aiming to build on that success in the coming months.”Last month the BBC said that 2017 was the “best year ever” for the iPlayer. Company stats revealed that viewers streamed 272 million programmes per month on average in 2017, with total requests growing to 3.3 billion – an 11% increase on the previous year.last_img read more

TV ad measurement company iSpottv is seeking to b

first_imgTV ad measurement company iSpot.tv is seeking to bolster the adoption of its TV advertising analytics technology with an additional US$30 million of investment capital.Sean MullerThe new money brings investment in iSpot.tv to US$57.8 million since the company started to offer real-time TV advertising analytics at scale in 2012.iSpot, which delivers actionable analytics to a wide range of US brands, says it has grown its annual subscription base to more than 200 blue-chip brands, and increased revenues 100% or more year-over-year for five years running.It says this rapid market adoption is down to iSpot’s ability to measure TV advertising with digital precision and help brands definitively attribute TV ad exposures to business outcomes.“We have entered a new era of TV advertising measurement that looks a lot more like digital, except on a medium not hampered by digital’s fraud challenges,” said iSpot founder and CEO Sean Muller.“The most important thing isn’t exactly how a TV ad gets on a screen or what programme or service it runs against. What matters is which factors are driving actions from customers. We’re helping brands take ownership of these insights to make greater impact on their business.”iSpot says it has built the consistent and actionable measurement required to support a shift from GRPs (Gross Rating Points) and rough estimates of age and gender to an audience and business outcome-based approach.Companies endorsing its approach include T-Mobile. “We trust iSpot and have partnered with them to push the envelope on how our TV advertising investment is deployed and how its effectiveness is measured,” said T-Mobile EVP marketing Nick Drake.last_img read more