McMafia The BBC reported a record 328 million prog

first_imgMcMafiaThe BBC reported a record 328 million programme requests on iPlayer in January, marking “the best month on record” for the catch-up service.The BBC said the number of shows accessed on the iPlayer in January was up 10% compared to the same month in 2017, with an average of 10.6 million daily requests for TV content in January this year.BBC crime drama McMafia was the most popular show of the month, with episode one of the series streamed 3.4 million times. Three other episodes from this series were among the top-10 most requested shows in January.The other top 10 most-requested shows of the month were episodes of the dramas Silent Witness and Hard Sun, as well as three episodes of long-running soap opera Eastenders.“2018 has got off to a flying start, thanks in no small part to a range of gripping BBC dramas. McMafia, Hard Sun and Silent Witness dominate our most popular programmes on iPlayer for January, as does the always strong-performing EastEnders,” said Dan McGolpin, controller of programming and daytime for the BBC.“It was also impressive to see the wildlife series Big Cats make this month’s top five performing series with an average of over 1 million requests per episode. It’s been a great start to the year, and we’re aiming to build on that success in the coming months.”Last month the BBC said that 2017 was the “best year ever” for the iPlayer. Company stats revealed that viewers streamed 272 million programmes per month on average in 2017, with total requests growing to 3.3 billion – an 11% increase on the previous year.last_img read more

It calls into question a flagrant disregard of th

first_img“It calls into question a flagrant disregard of the needs of people in this historically neglected area of the city- not to mention the quality of utilities used by DfI given that this intentional damage was seemingly carried out with ease on not one but two lampposts.“The vandals involved in this senseless destruction need to get a grip. “This inconsiderate stupidity only serves to disadvantage those within their community.“Considering these essential streetlights are directly outside local retail facilities and the area is therefore heavily utilised, DfI needs to find the resources to ensure they are fixed as soon as possible,” added Mr Durkan.Durkan slams DfI response to urgent repair of Creggan street-lighting was last modified: July 22nd, 2019 by John2John2 Tags: “Firstly, the vandalism of two lampposts outside Creggan shops must not and cannot be tolerated. “The remaining stumps with exposing wires posed potential safety risks to residents, particularly children who frequent this area.“And whilst I have received assurances that these columns have now been sealed and marked with hazard tape, I find this solution highly unsatisfactory. “The vagueness in response alluding to lack of resources is simply not good enough. ShareTweet CENTRAL DRIVECRegganDFIDurkan slams DfI response to urgent repair of Creggan street-lightingFOYLE MLAMark H DurkanSDLPvandalism THE SDLP’s Mark H Durkan has blasted a response from DfI regarding the urgent maintenance of vandalised street lighting in the Central Drive area of Creggan as “disappointing”. Following safety concerns raised with DfI, Mr Durkan has been advised that these columns will not be replaced until ‘resources become available.’Said the Foyle MLA: “The response from DfI is hugely disappointing to say the least.last_img read more

Watch No need to ask for a vote of confidence – Delia

first_img SharePrint Partit Nazzjonalista leader Adrian Delia said that there is no need to ask for a vote of confidence at the General Council, saying that the Party needs to look forward.READ: Watch: PN MPs meeting: “Constructive”; “inconclusive”Speaking to Newsbook.com.mt in Brussels, Delia reacted to the reports in which sources were cited saying that various MPs urged the embattled leader to take the test. Delia reiterated that the party’s paid-up members had given him a mandate until the upcoming general election.READ: Will you resign Mr Delia? NoDelia was elected with 7,734 votes while MP Chris Said had gained 6,932 votes during the last round in the PN’s leadership race. A total of 19,350 paid-up members were eligible to vote however 3,849 paid members did not pick up their vote meaning that 15,501 were able to vote. Delia has repeatedly said that he will not be seeking a vote of confidence within the party structures and cited the paid members support mandate.READ: ‘I will not be resigning’ – DeliaThe Nationalist leader spoke about the proposals he put forward to the parliamentary group which according to him should serve as a framework. One of the proposals includes a parliamentary group meeting every fortnight, which used to meet every week in the last legislature.READ: We need to learn why people didn’t vote PN – DeliaWhen asked when will decisions be taken, Delia said that the process requires time. Further he added that nothing has changed over the last three weeks,  as internal discussions are still ongoing. He explained that change will come slowly.WhatsApp <a href=’http://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/ck.php?n=ab2c8853&amp;cb={random}’ target=’_blank’><img src=’https://revive.newsbook.com.mt/www/delivery/avw.php?zoneid=97&amp;cb={random}&amp;n=ab2c8853&amp;ct0={clickurl_enc}’ border=’0′ alt=” /></a>last_img read more

Unique AED pads give hearts a second chance

first_imgAddThis ShareCONTACT: Mike WilliamsPHONE: 713-348-6728EMAIL:mikewilliams@rice.eduUnique AED pads give hearts a second chance  Rice University, Texas Heart Institute collaborators invent life-saving deviceAn invention by Rice University bioengineering students in collaboration with the Texas Heart Institute (THI) is geared toward giving immediate second chances to arrhythmia victims headed toward cardiac arrest.For their capstone design project, a team of Rice seniors created a unique pad system for automated external defibrillators (AEDs), common devices that can shock a victim’s heart back into a proper rhythm in an emergency. Often, the first shock doesn’t reset a heart and the procedure must be repeated, but the sticky pads on the chest must first be repositioned. The pads need to be in the right location to send current through the heart, and someone with no experience who tries to provide aid might miss the first time.The Second-Chance AED Pads let rescuers try again without losing valuable time to remove the pads from the victim’s chest. The pads incorporate three electrodes, two in a single pad with an A/B switch attached, and a third in its own pad. If one shock doesn’t restart the patient’s heart, flipping the switch will change the jolt’s path, just a little bit, for the second attempt.The pads were developed by students on the DefibTaskForce — Lisa Jiang, Joanna Nathan, Justin Lin, Carl Nelson and Brad Otto — in tandem with Mehdi Razavi, director of electrophysiology clinical research at THI, and their adviser, Renata Ramos, a Rice lecturer in bioengineering. The potential for their project was clear from the beginning. “We did some calculations that suggested we could save at least 13,000 lives per year,” Otto said. “Cardiac defibrillation is very time-sensitive. Thirty seconds can be the difference between life and death in a lot of situations. The time it takes to flip the switch is negligible compared with the time it takes to remove the pads, shave and prep a new area on the body, reapply the pads and administer another shock. And a layman might not even know to try a second position.”Rather than try to build a new type of AED, the team decided early on that it was enough to simply design new pads that would fit devices that are already in use. Manufacturers generally require AED pads be replaced every two years, which provides a ready market for the students’ invention. “But well over 100,000 AED units are produced every year, so even if our pads are only paired with new AEDs, we have a significant market,” Lin said. Getting the instructions right turned out to be just as important as the device itself and required a lot of illustrative trial and error. In tests for the final version at Rice’s Oshman Engineering Design Kitchen, the team recruited students with no experience using an AED to shock a medical mannequin back to life. “We had 100 percent of the testers place the pads correctly, showing it was very intuitive to use,” Jiang said. All five team members, along with Razavi and Ramos, are listed on the provisional patent. They hope an AED manufacturer will pick up the rights to the Second-Chance pads for clinical trials and ultimately FDA approval. -30-A video of students demonstrating the Second-Chance pads is available at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FYChUo1oJM4Download high-resolution photos of the team and device athttp://www.media.rice.edu/images/media/NEWSRELS/0425_AED1.jpghttp://www.media.rice.edu/images/media/NEWSRELS/0425_AED2.jpgCAPTIONS:(Instructions)Rice University students developed a clear, concise instruction card for use with automated external defibrillators fitted with Second-Chance AED Pads. They wanted complete novices to be able to use the device with minimum hesitation. (Credit Jeff Fitlow/Rice University)(Team)Members of Rice University’s DefibTaskForce, clockwise from left, are Lisa Jiang, Justin Lin, Carl Nelson, Joanna Nathan and Brad Otto. They have developed a set of replacement pads for automated external defibrillators that quickly give rescuers a second chance at shocking a heart back into a proper rhythm. (Credit Jeff Fitlow/Rice University) last_img read more